Advancement

Cub Scout Advancement

cub scout all programs

Recognition is important to young boys. The Cub Scout advancement plan provides fun for the boys, gives them a sense of personal achievement as they earn rank badges and extra awards. It also strengthens family understanding as adult family members work with boys on various advancement projects. All of the activities which are part of the advancement requirements are age-appropriate to the den.

Bobcat

bobcat

The Bobcat rank is for all boys who join Cub Scouting. Every new Cub Scout, regardless of his age, earns the Bobcat rank before he receives any other award. A Cub Scout earns this award by learning and demonstrating he has learned the basics of Cub Scouting. This involves learning the Cub Scout Promise and the Law of the Pack in addition to other facets of Cub Scout information

Tiger Cub

tiger

The Tiger Cub program is for first grade (or age 7) boys and their adult partners. There are five Tiger Cub achievement areas. The Tiger Cub, working with his adult partner, completes 15 requirements within these areas to earn the Tiger Cub Badge. These requirements consist of an exciting series of indoor and outdoor activities just right for a boy in the first grade. After he has earned his rank, there are 50 elective activities for him to continue to learn and grow with his adult partner. For each elective he completes, he earns a bead to display.

Wolf

Wolf

The Wolf program is for boys who have completed first grade (or are age 8). To earn the Wolf badge, a boy must pass twelve achievements involving simple physical and mental skills. After he has earned his rank, a boy may continue earning awards in the form of arrow points. For every 10 arrow point activities he completes, he earns an arrow point to display under his rank badge.

Bear

bear

The Bear rank is for boys who have completed second grade (or are age 9). There are 24 Bear achievements in four categories. The Cub Scout must complete 12 of these to earn the Bear badge. These requirements are somewhat more difficult and challenging than those for Wolf rank. After he has earned his rank, a boy may continue earning awards in the form of arrow points. For every 10 arrow point activities he completes, he earns an arrow point to display under his rank badge.

Webelos

webelos

The Webelos rank is for boys who have completed third grade (or are age 10). A boy may begin working on the Webelos badge as soon as he joins a Webelos den. This is the first step in his transition from the Webelos den to the Boy Scout troop. As he completes the requirements found in the Webelos Scout Book, he will work on activity badges, attend meetings led by adults, and become familiar with the Boy Scout requirements-all leading to the Arrow of Light Award.

Arrow of Light

Arrow of light

The Arrow of Light is the highest rank that Cub Scouts offers. It is one of only a very select few Cub Scout awards that can transfer to a Boy Scout uniform (the others being knot awards like the religious knot) and even be desplayed on an adult leader uniform in knot form. A Cub Scout begins working on this award in the Webelos den. The Arrow of Light may be earned in conjunction with earning the Webelos badge depending upon how much time he has in the Webelos den.

Additional Awards

There are several opportunities for Cub Scouts to be recognized above and beyond the rank recognition program. The Segment Program and the Scout Month patch have been developed in the Grand Teton Council to recognize Scouts for their extra effort in the program. The Academics and Sports Program (belt loops and pins), the NOVA and Super NOVA programs, and several outdoor awards have been implemented at a national level for added for additional achievement opportunities.

To check out some of these awards closer, see this page on Cub Scout awards.

Religious Awards

Relious Knot

A Scout will do their duty to God. In the religious award program, Scouts can be recognized for doing their Duty to God. Many different religions have awards which the BSA recognizes under this knot. Check with your local religious leadership to learn what awards are available for you.