Boy Scouts

Boy Scouting

Boy Scouting

This is the traditional Scouting experience for youth in the fifth grade through high school. Service, community engagement and leadership development become increasingly important parts of the program as youth lead their own activities and work their way toward earning Scouting’s highest rank, Eagle Scout.

How Scouting Works

The Scouting program is delivered through local civic, faith-based, and educational institutions called chartered organizations, which operate Scouting units to deliver the programs to their youth members, as well as the community at large. 

Why Boy Scouting?

Boy Scouts has a lot to offer, but don’t let the number of merit badges scare you away. With exposure to a uniquely hands-on learning experience and the opportunity to earn merit badges reflecting each Scout’s budding interests, youth unlock a world of discovery around them and forge a path for the future.

As an 11-year-old, Academy Award® winner Steven Spielberg kicked off his filmmaking career in the Boy Scouts using his father’s 8mm movie camera to film a nine-minute Western called “The Last Gunfight.” It earned him a merit badge for photography.
Leave this world a little better than you found it.

— Robert Baden-Powell, founder of the worldwide Scout Movement

The Order of the Arrow is Scouting’s national honor society. The OA focuses on service, activities, adventures, and training for youth and adults.

You can learn about sports, crafts, science, trades, business, and future careers as you earn merit badges. There are more than 135 merit badges, and any Boy Scout or Varsity Scout, or any qualified Venturer or Sea Scout may earn any of these at any time.

There are more than 150 awards you can earn as a Boy Scout. Whether it’s a rank advancement, merit badge or one of the many other individual awards, there’s plenty for you to set your sights on.

Boy Scouts. Be Prepared. For Anything.

Most boys avoid obstacles. Boy Scouts seek them. They live for an opportunity to display their abilities while learning new skills. Camping is fun. But surviving a downpour in the middle of the night, that’s an adventure. Cooking over a campfire is fun. Learning which wild berries are edible is survival. Spending a weekend in the woods is fun. Breaking camp without leaving a trace is admirable. These are invaluable experiences that can be had in Scouting. These are life lessons that transform today’s Boy Scouts into tomorrow’s leaders.

A Scout is trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean, and reverent.

On my honor I will do my best
To do my duty to God and my country
and to obey the Scout Law;
To help other people at all times;
To keep myself physically strong,
mentally awake, and morally straight.

Be Prepared.

The Boy Scout uniform has the following parts:

1. Shirt – The official uniform shirt is tan with long or short sleeves and has button-flap pockets and “Boy Scouts of America” lettered in Red above the right pocket.

2. Trousers or shorts – Official olive or forest green.

3. Belt – Official olive web belt with metal buckle and Boy Scout emblem.

4. Socks – Official socks are olive or forest green and  available in three lengths: ankle, crew, and knee.

5. Cap – Official forest green cap with the BSA Emblem.

6. Neckerchief – Triangular neckerchief comes in 10 colors. Official BSA neckerchiefs are the only neckerchiefs that boys should wear specific to their troop.

7. Neckerchief slide – Official gold-tone metal slide with the BSA logo. Boys may wear handmade neckerchief slides.

bs-essentials

Advancement

In the Scouting program, recognition is gained through leadership in the unit, attending and participating in activities, living the principles of Scouting and developing a proficiency in outdoor life, useful skills and career exploration.

Measurement is done by means of skills. Skills are designed to provide Boy Scouts with a chance to achieve the three goals of Scouting: good citizenship, growth in moral strength and character and mental and physical fitness. Skills allow a Scout to grow in confidence and self-reliance and provide good wholesome fun.

Unlike Cub Scouting, Boy Scout rank advancement does not depend on a Scout’s age. Every new Scout starts at the same point – the Scout badge. Starting a few years after his peers does not make it impossible for a Boy Scout to earn the Eagle Scout award.

Guide to Advancement

ScoutTenderfootSecond ClassFirst ClassStarLifeEagleArrow of LightReligious AwardsAdditional Awards

The Scout rank is oriented toward learning the basic information every boy needs to know to be a good Scout. It starts with the Scout demonstrating his knowledge and understanding of the Scout Oath, Scout Law, Scout motto, and Scout slogan and then introduces him to basic troop operations and safety concerns.

Tenderfoot, Second Class, and First Class ranks are oriented toward learning and practicing skills that will help the Scout develop confidence and fitness, challenge his thought processes, introduce him to his responsibilities as a citizen, and prepare him for an exciting and successful Scouting experience. Requirements for Tenderfoot, Second Class, and First Class may be passed at any time after the Scout badge has been earned. For example, a Scout working toward Tenderfoot may fulfill and be signed off on all the first aid– related requirements for all three of the ranks. For information on boards of review for these ranks, see “Particulars for Tenderfoot Through Life Ranks (or Palms),” 8.0.2.0, especially point No. 7.

Tenderfoot, Second Class, and First Class ranks are oriented toward learning and practicing skills that will help the Scout develop confidence and fitness, challenge his thought processes, introduce him to his responsibilities as a citizen, and prepare him for an exciting and successful Scouting experience. Requirements for Tenderfoot, Second Class, and First Class may be passed at any time after the Scout badge has been earned. For example, a Scout working toward Tenderfoot may fulfill and be signed off on all the first aid– related requirements for all three of the ranks. For information on boards of review for these ranks, see “Particulars for Tenderfoot Through Life Ranks (or Palms),” 8.0.2.0, especially point No. 7.

Tenderfoot, Second Class, and First Class ranks are oriented toward learning and practicing skills that will help the Scout develop confidence and fitness, challenge his thought processes, introduce him to his responsibilities as a citizen, and prepare him for an exciting and successful Scouting experience. Requirements for Tenderfoot, Second Class, and First Class may be passed at any time after the Scout badge has been earned. For example, a Scout working toward Tenderfoot may fulfill and be signed off on all the first aid– related requirements for all three of the ranks. For information on boards of review for these ranks, see “Particulars for Tenderfoot Through Life Ranks (or Palms),” 8.0.2.0, especially point No. 7.

All requirements for Star, Life, and Eagle, except for those related to merit badges, must be fulfilled after the successful completion of a board of review for the previous rank.

In Boy Scouting, advancement requirements must be passed as written. If, for example, a requirement uses words like “show,” “demonstrate,” or “discuss,” then that is what Scouts must do. Filling out a worksheet, for example, would not suffice.

All requirements for Star, Life, and Eagle, except for those related to merit badges, must be fulfilled after the successful completion of a board of review for the previous rank.

In Boy Scouting, advancement requirements must be passed as written. If, for example, a requirement uses words like “show,” “demonstrate,” or “discuss,” then that is what Scouts must do. Filling out a worksheet, for example, would not suffice.

 

All requirements for Star, Life, and Eagle, except for those related to merit badges, must be fulfilled after the successful completion of a board of review for the previous rank.

In Boy Scouting, advancement requirements must be passed as written. If, for example, a requirement uses words like “show,” “demonstrate,” or “discuss,” then that is what Scouts must do. Filling out a worksheet, for example, would not suffice.

 

The Arrow of Light is the highest rank that Cub Scouts offers. It is one of only a very select few Cub Scout awards that can transfer to a Boy Scout uniform (the others being knot awards like the religious knot) and even be desplayed on an adult leader uniform in knot form. A Cub Scout begins working on this award in the Webelos den. The Arrow of Light may be earned in conjunction with earning the Webelos badge depending upon how much time he has in the Webelos den.

A Scout will do their duty to God. In the religious award program, Scouts can be recognized for doing their Duty to God. Many different religions have awards which the BSA recognizes under this knot. Check with your local religious leadership to learn what awards are available for you.

There are several opportunities for Boy Scouts to be recognized above and beyond the rank recognition program. The Segment Program and the Scout Month patch have been developed in the Grand Teton Council to recognize Scouts for their extra effort in the program. The Academics and Sports Program (belt loops and pins), the NOVA and Super NOVA programs, and several outdoor awards have been implemented at a national level for added for additional achievement opportunities.